Department 13 search and rescue

Photo credit: drdrone.ca

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drones could soon be as essential as ambulances when it comes to the future of emergency response missions.

The first responders are now aided by an extra set of eyes in the sky when responding to emergency situations.

According to Mike Johnson, Regional Emergency Management Coordinator for Cumberland County NS, "Drone usage is becoming more and more popular simply because of the costs and time saved. In contrast to putting a helicopter in the air, they are a lot less expensive, and you can attach equipment to a drone that can better serve your needs at a fraction of the cost."

Reported on drdrone.ca Read the entire article here.

How Department 13's advanced technology can assist in the commercial industry: 

Our Scout13 capability easily integrates into existing C2 systems and accompanying drone sensor/mitigation platforms, to facilitate more enhanced capabilities.

When Scout13 is combined with a drone management system, it can assist in delivering pre, post and in-flight operational awareness and audit functions, making site safety and audit efficient and simple.

Department 13 are the industry thought leader for sUAS and counter sUAV technology. To find out how Department 13 technology can assist your industry or specific requirements, contact us for an initial confidential discussion.

Department 13 drone technology

Drone adoption in the oil and gas industry initially revolves around strategic deployments for remote monitoring and surveillance of assets during regular operations and in emergency situations.

Drones are primarily used in the oil and gas industry for remote monitoring and surveillance. This covers infrastructure, equipment, tankers and trucks, and other assets. Drones can provide a 360-degree view for monitoring field operations. They can also observe the progress of facilities that are under construction, and provide encroachment detection. Remote monitoring using drones is also enabling oil and gas companies to inspect unmanned production platforms.

Reported on offshore-technology.com: Read the entire article here.

How Department 13's advanced technology can assist in the commercial industry: 

Our Scout13 capability easily integrates into existing C2 systems and accompanying drone sensor/mitigation platforms, to facilitate more enhanced capabilities.

When Scout13 is combined with a drone management system, it can assist in delivering pre, post and in-flight operational awareness and audit functions, making site safety and audit efficient and simple.

Department 13 are the industry thought leader for sUAS and counter sUAV technology. To find out how Department 13 technology can assist your industry or specific requirements, contact us for an initial confidential discussion.

Department 13

CASA has developed a suite of standard scenarios that may be used to apply for BVLOS operations.

To date, CASA has assessed BVLOS applications on a case-by-case basis according to the SORA process, with the process individually repeated for each new application. With increasing numbers of BVLOS applications being submitted, CASA has chosen to create standard scenarios for pre-defined operational characteristics to determine the likely mitigations and SORA assessment outcomes for operations that meet those characteristics. As these scenarios have been created according to specified operational characteristics, they can be applied to a wide range of use cases.

For each standard scenario, CASA has developed guidance material for operators to use when submitting a BVLOS application, including information about how to assess an area, and the mitigations and procedures required to support the application.

Standard scenarios have the following characteristics:

Reported on casa.gov.au: Read the entire article here.

Why Department 13 believes CASA has adopted these scenarios:

These scenarios demonstrate CASA maturity within the drone industry.

Department 13 are the industry thought leader for sUAS and counter sUAV technology. To find out how Department 13 technology can assist your industry or specific requirements, contact us for an initial confidential discussion.

Department 13 volunteers cutting-edge assistance to search for potential evidence in some of the ACT’s long-standing unsolved murders and disappearances.

Like something out of a sci-fi film, the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology of Department 13 has the capability to assist in new ways in old investigations. This could include that of 20-year-old Keren Rowland, whose body was found in the Fairbairn Pine Forest in 1971.

According to CEO Lee Croft, these technologies can provide access and coverage in ways often not otherwise possible.

“More and more, drones are used in everything from intelligence gathering, physical security to surveillance, disasters to crime scenes,” he says.

“A system being developed in the US can even analyse drone footage to determine whether people are alive or not”.

Reported on citynews.com.au: Read the entire article here.

To find out how Department 13 technology can assist your industry or specific requirements, contact us for an initial confidential discussion.

From the perspective of history, the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan may be most significant as the driver of a step-change in drone warfare.

In 2000, the U.S. Air Force and CIA did not have a single armed drone; by the end of 2001 drone strikes had become an important tactic against al-Qaeda in Afghanistan. Since then drone operations have ballooned, and have been used by U.S. forces in many other theatres. Large drones are starting to break out of the counterinsurgency role into more traditional warfighting, and portable tactical drones play an increasingly important role in infantry combat. None of this would have happened without Afghanistan.

Reported on Forbes.com: Read the entire article here.

How Department 13's advanced technology could assist in the commercial industry;

To find out how Department 13 technology can assist your industry or specific requirements, contact us for an initial confidential discussion.

 

Read the National Emerging Aviation Technologies (NEAT) Policy Statement here.

To find out how Department 13 technology can assist your industry or specific requirements, contact us for an initial confidential discussion. 

Afghan policemen in Alamgai Market lament that their Taliban foes are better equipped than they themselves (Franz J. Marty, November 21, 2020)

 

The Taliban have been weaponizing commercially available drones into their arsenal for some time.

SAYED KARAM, PAKTIA, AFGHANISTAN —  While the Taliban have since at least 2016 used camera-equipped commercial drones to film propaganda footage, it was, as far as it could be determined, only in early October 2020 that they began to use such unmanned aerial vehicles for attacks. Although, as of writing, there have been few such attacks with weaponized commercial drones, they are significant for several reasons. They exemplify that the Taliban remain — despite engaging the Afghan government and other Afghan stakeholders in peace negotiations — intent on fighting the Afghan government and employ new, ingenious tactics to do so. Furthermore, and even though the impact of such drone attacks has so far remained limited, they threaten to demoralize Afghan government forces who perceive themselves to face a better-equipped enemy. 

Another policeman from the district centre of Sayed Karam claimed that in some instances, Taliban drones had dropped improvised bomblets made out of plastic Pepsi bottles filled with explosives and closed with a trigger in the bottleneck. And a video that was later shared on Twitter and allegedly taken in Khost, a province neighbouring Paktia, showed a 40 mm M433 high-explosive dual-purpose grenade cartridge that is usually meant to be shot with a grenade launcher but was apparently modified to be triggered on impact when dropped from a drone.

Reported on diplomat.com: Read the entire article here.

How Department 13's advanced technology could assist in the commercial industry;

To find out how Department 13 technology can assist your industry or specific requirements, contact us for an initial confidential discussion.

A drone assault on the world’s largest oil-export terminal in Saudi Arabi recently occurred, causing a fire and a brief spike in oil prices. In other reports, a missile was also launched but was intercepted. The incident marks a serious escalation in the country's rebel attacks from the air.

Approximately six drones struck the oil facility in the capital of Riyadh on Friday, igniting a fire at the installation.

Saudi Arabia condemned the attack, saying it targeted ‘the security and stability of the world’s energy supplies.

Reported on aljazeera.com: Read the entire article here.

How Department 13's advanced technology could assist in the commercial industry;

To find out how Department 13 technology can assist your industry or specific requirements, contact us for an initial confidential discussion.

Properly monitoring hurricanes is now more important than ever. 2020's Atlantic hurricane season was quite literally a disaster (like the rest of the year?). Record after record fell as a new wave of unprecedented storms bombarded North and Central America.

The brutal hurricane season brought 30 named tropical storms, 13 hurricanes, and six significant hurricanes; the highest on record, the second-highest on record, and another second-highest on record, respectively. The season brought with it economic loss, fatalities, and crippling damage to infrastructure throughout the region. According to reports, this season was 73% more active than usual. Even though the season is now over, the wounds from these significant storms are still very fresh. Overall, hurricanes appear to be getting stronger.

In a study published on Nature, climate experts have stated that as the world warms from the effects of climate change, North Atlantic hurricanes will retain far more of their strength when they hit land. This, in turn, tends to lead to more destruction and fatalities. This "perfect storm" has led to the increased use of technologically advanced instruments for tracking and predicting hurricanes. Drones are emerging as a useful tool for climate scientists on the hunt for hurricanes. 

Drones could be the future of data collection

Climate scientists and meteorologists have been adopting drone technology in recent years too. Researchers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) believe that one-day drones may become a regular part of hurricane forecasting. In a paper published as recently as 2019, the NOAA demonstrated how disposable drones could gather data from a hurricane's lower eyewall — the most dangerous part of a hurricane. 

Real-time data from a hurricane's lower eyewall could prove to be extremely useful to meteorologists. This area indicates how strongly and quickly a storm will develop. A better understanding of the eyewall would allow forecasters to gather a more accurate picture of how a hurricane is progressing and could use this data to improve their forecasting model with higher accuracy in real-time. Crewed flights into this part of the storm are out of the question as this area of the hurricane has some of the strongest winds.

Since 2005, and in collaboration with Raytheon, NOAA has been developing drones capable of temporarily flying through the turbulent winds of a hurricane. Since around 2016, Raytheon's Coyote fixed-wing drones have been used to track important weather measurements like temperatures, pressure, wind speed, wind direction, humidity, and sea surface temperature. 

Reported on interestingengineering.com: Read the entire article here.

To find out how Department 13 technology can assist your industry or specific requirements, contact us for an initial confidential discussion.

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